USC Pharmacy School Application Requirements and Tips From an Accepted Student

I will begin with the statistics of the accepted students into the University of Southern California Doctor of Pharmacy program for 2009. 460 students were offered interviews from a pool of over 2000 applicants. 240 students are accepted (11 students from out-of-state schools), and the expected class size for 2009 is 190. One must note that USC offers their undergraduates the opportunity of guaranteed admission as long as they complete their requirements in the TAP program (these students take up a large chunk of seats available for other applicants).

Obtaining a Bachelor’s degree is now a requirement for admission at USC. The minimum GPA requirement is a 3.0 (the average GPA of accepted students is a 3.60). Since USC does not require taking the PCAT, other admission criteria is weighed more heavily (GPA, interview performance, extracurricular activities, personal statements, etc.).

For the application process, it is very important for you to note that the University of Southern California sends out interview invitations on a rolling basis, so it is important that you turn in your PharmCAS application and supplemental application as soon as possible. The deadlines for both are early November, but I highly recommend that you turn both in no latter than early August (I turned in my applications by mid-July, just 1.5 months after the application was made available).

At your interview, you will be asked questions by a current pharmacy school student as well as a faculty member. Think of it more of a conversation where you also ask questions back to both of them. When you first arrive at the interview session, you will be greeted by several current pharmacy students, who do a great job of calming you down prior to your interview. Take this opportunity to ask questions and warm up your oral communication skills. Do not worry to much about the “essay” portion as it is just a test of how well you take notes off of a random article that you read. BE SURE to follow all directions provided to you as it is also a test on how well you pay attention to details.

Here are the pre-requisites for USC’s pharmacy program:

Calculus (for science majors)

Statistics (non-business)

Physics w/lab (science/life science majors- thermodynamics & Electromagnetism recommended)

General Biology w/lab (excludes human anatomy & physiology, botany, and microbiology)

Mammalian Physiology w/lab (human preferred-excludes plant, cell and marine physiology)

Microbiology w/lab (fundamentals of microbiology for science majors)

Molecular or Cell Biology(for science majors-one upper division course)

General Chemistry w/lab (for science majors-include inorganic & qualitative analysis)

Organic Chemistry w/lab (for science majors)

Biochemistry (for science majors one upper division course)

Human Behavior (General Psychology or Introductory Sociology)

Microeconomics

For Internationals (holders of foreign US bachelor’s equivalent):

English (expository writing)

Interpersonal Communications or Public Speaking

For specific course equivalencies from your college, please check the forms available from USC’s website.

The Pharm.D. program at USC is a 4 year program. USC is a private school, and our estimated tuition and cost of living for 2009 is approximately $60,000.

The University of Southern California provides students the opportunity to pursue dual degrees in addition to their Doctor of Pharmacy Degree. These include the following:

Pharm.D./Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)

Pharm.D./Juris Doctor(J.D.)

Pharm.D./Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Pharm.D./Master of Science in Regulatory Science (M.S. Regulatory Science)

Pharm.D./ Master of Science in Gerontology (M.S.G.)

Pharm.D./Graduate Certificate in Gerontology (Gerontology Certificate)

Pharm.D./Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

5 Tips to Wow the Admission Officer With Your College Application Essay

It’s time in your life that you search the internet for essay help to use for that dreaded college application, right? Now calm down, pay attention, and read along to find out just how you can impress whoever will be reading your college application essay.

First, Get to Know Yourself

Before you can start drafting your essay, it would greatly help to list down your strengths and anything that comes up to mind when you hear the words “What makes you, you?” When it comes to college application, the best essay help to remember would be this one. Why? College application essays exist mainly for one thing; to let the admission officers get to know you like no numbers on your test scores or bulleted facts on your resume could.

Honesty Catches the Eye

Fact is that you would like to impress those admission officers in all ways possible. With this in mind, you might be tempted to answer the essay thinking about what are the likely answers that would make such effect. But another fact is this; those college admission officers already know what you’re thinking. They can already spot the formulaic, insincere answers that usually come up from applicants who think first on how to impress instead of what I believe or what matters to me. If there’s another essay help, you should remember it’s this; honesty first.

Specificity Over Generalizations, Please

Some colleges have prompts or essay questions while others give you the freedom to pick whatever you want to write about. In both cases, choose a specific topic – it could be an ultra-unique experience or perhaps a quirky quality/interest you possess – and expand on it, use it to relate to the question (if ever there is) and stick to that viewpoint. Nobody wants to hear about your beliefs on, say, religion; what people would want to know is why, what are the specific events that happened in your life that led you to form those beliefs.

Know the Basics

When students ask for essay help they usually get the technical stuff. Knowing the basics of these technicalities does help. Thus, you should outline your ideas; have a compelling introduction that introduces your main viewpoint in one paragraph; build using specific examples to support your main viewpoint in two or three paragraphs, then in one paragraph, form a strong conclusion.

“Does It Sound Like Me?”

That is what you should ask yourself once you read aloud your entire essay after lots of revisions and proofreading. If you answer yes, then you’re all set. If not, then no problem, just rewrite it again and this time, write like how you would talk to a close friend – minus the slang, of course!

Do not hesitate to ask your parents, teachers and friends (and if you can find an adult stranger who could provide you impartial feedback, the better) for essay help. Remember, this is college; your essay might be one of the factors that could set the direction for the rest of your life.