7 College Essay Writing Tips to Blow Their Socks Off!

1. Write your college application essay before your senior year begins. Senior year is very busy, and you don’t need another distraction from concentrating on what’s more important: your studies. Get it brainstormed, drafted, corrected and finally written before September 1.

2. Find a topic that you know better than anyone. For example, you’re a dancer because you use dance as a way to express with your body what you cannot express with your vocal cords. Who knows the language of your body better than you do? Who knows more about what you say with your dance than you do? You’re the expert, which is why it’ll be a whole lot easier for you to communicate what you want to say. Read: your essay can be one easy task!

3. Keep it simple. By way of illustration, let’s say you’re standing on a street corner and you witness a car crash in front of you; you were the only one who witnessed the crash, and the police have asked you to write a description of what you saw. Why did the police ask you? Because they know you are the expert in what you experienced in that brief moment of the car crash. You could write about a brief moment in your life that had some positive impact on you because you are the expert on how that moment affected you. Keeping it simple also means using simple words, so throw away the thesaurus.

4. Make your first statement of the essay the most powerful. Readers in a college admissions office believe 80% of the essays they read are a waste of time. So make your first statement a “hook” – a pleasant surprise that catches their attention from the get-go. Here are some example first-sentences of what some of my students wrote last year:

“I was suddenly surrounded by rifles pointing at me.” (theme: paintball) “It was clear that I was completely cut off from civilization.” (theme: wilderness hiking) “I had nowhere to go but down.” (theme: overachieving) “Pain was a requirement for me to succeed.” (theme: dancing/ballet)

5. Read your essay out loud. Besides your eyes use your ears to hear what you’re saying. Reading out loud gives you another sense of how the essay is moving, and you’ll be able to tell if it sounds right or needs improvement. Then get friends and family members to read and listen to what you’re saying. Ask for comments and suggestions.

6. Essays should be no longer than 500 words. Give the admissions reader another reason to LOVE you – keep it shorter than 500 words. The 500-word limit has been a standard for years, and the Common App now allows you to write more than 500 words. With short attention spans in a college admissions office, do you think colleges are excited that the Common App allows you to write more than they want to read? Less is more, or quality beats quantity every time.

7. Keep your essay upbeat and positive. My favorite college essay requirement comes from the College of William & Mary: “Surprise us!” What they’re asking you to do is write something that’s positive. Why? Like most colleges they’re so used to reading the seven deadly topics they don’t like: divorce, disabilities, death, dysfunctional behavior, trips, sports injuries, and boyfriend/girlfriend breakups. Not to write about these topics would be a huge surprise.

College And University Debt Bomb Is About To Blow – That Bubble Is Ready To Burst

It’s over, there is no possible way to ever save the college loan crisis, and when this bubble bursts it will greatly affect all Americans. As of October 1, 2016 there were 44.2 million people in the US that have student loan debt, most of these student loans have parents or grandparents as cosigners, and it gets worse, as the fallout rates or technical default rates could be as high as 50%. If this doesn’t worry you, then you are not paying attention.

Recently there was an article in Activist Post titled: “America’s Problem with Student Loans Is Much Bigger than Anybody Realized,” by Shaun Bradley published on February 2, 2017. The article stated the sum of all fears:

“The Department of Education recently released their findings that repayment rates on student loans have been grossly exaggerated. Data from 99.8% of schools across the country has been manipulated to cover up growing problems with the $1.3 trillion in outstanding student loans.”

The article also noted that the default rates are 50% now, and huge numbers have never made a single payment, others no payments within 7-years and the default rate went from 38% to 50% in less than 2-years. Why? Most likely due to all the talk about “free college for everyone” during the recent presidential election, and if you will recall both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders both talked about college tuition loan forgiveness, and free college for everyone.

Right now, the bad debt equals more than $650 Billion, and the taxpayer is on the hook for a good chunk of that, but we will all feel the fallout regardless. Welcome to the power of socialism.

The USA Today noted that; “Approximately 90% of private student loans are co-signed by a parent, according to a 2012 report by the CFPB and the Department of Education – that’s up significantly from previous years,” in an article titled; “The dangers of co-signing a student loan,” by Jessica Dickler of CNBC put forth on January 16, 2016.

We all by now know that most of those leaving school with degrees will not work in the job categories of that knowledge set. Only 15% are expected to still be working in fields for which they got their degrees, and many of those jobs won’t be around in the next 10-years.

What are we doing to fix the problem? Nothing it seems, college tuition increases continue each year, and new semesters start twice or three times a year, more debt, more students, more loans, more defaults, the bubble is on autopilot but the rubber is about to splatter all over the room, and unfortunately, it’s too later. Of course, everyone is going to find someone to blame; Obama Administration, Banks, Students, Universities, and those wealthy one-percenters of course. Sure, the left will blame capitalism and the right will blame socialist – does it matter now?

Didn’t we just recover from the mortgage crisis bubble, and 2008 crash? What did we learn? Not much apparently. Well, way to go humans, you got caught up once again in your BS and echo chamber – I had hopes for you, but you keep proving yourselves incapable – humans? Please think on this.

Recommended Reading:

(1) Article: WSJ (Wall Street Journal), “Student Debt Payback Far Worse Than Believed – Revised Education Department numbers shows at more than 1,000 schools, at least half of students defaulted or failed to pay down debt within 7 years,” by Andrea Fuller, January 18, 2017.

(2) Book: “Campus Politics – What Everyone Needs to Know,” by Jonathan Zimmerman, Oxford, 2016, 146 pages, ISBN: 978-0190627409.

(3) YouTube Video: “Did You Know”