4 Quick Tips to Pass the GED Test

People who are not able to complete high school have another chance to get a certification that’s equivalent to a high school diploma-by passing the GED test.

The GED test is the only high school certification program that’s recognized in all 50 states, according to GED Testing Service. It gives individuals who are least 16 years old and are not enrolled in high school a second chance to get their high school certification.

Some people are not able to complete high school for various reasons. It can be because they decided to drop out and pursue other things, it can be due to financial or health setbacks, or it can be because they have migrated from another country and their education credentials are not recognized in the US. The GED test gives these people the chance to have their high school diploma, which they can use to apply for college or to land better jobs. All they need to do is to pass the test, which covers four subjects: language arts, mathematics, history, and science.

How to Pass the GED Test

1. Know the scope of the test.

The first thing you need to do when preparing for the GED exam is to know the topics covered. Get access to a GED study guide, which tells you the coverage of the exam, how many minutes you will be given to complete the test, and the types of questions you will find in the test. This will help you save time by studying only what’s included in the actual test.

2. Assess your skill level.

After determining the scope of the test, check your skill level. Evaluate your current knowledge and skills. Doing so will help you determine which areas you need to focus on. For example, if you are weak in algebra, then you should focus on studying the subject and its components, such as solving rational equations or performing operations on polynomials.

3. Practice.

After studying, the key to retaining the information you’ve learned and ensure you have a good understanding of the topic is to take mock tests. Practice tests are offered on GED preparation websites. Practicing your skills solidifies what you have learned from studying.

4. Prepare your body, too.

When preparing for the GED, you don’t just prepare your mind, but also your body. Get 7 to 9 hours of sleep to enhance your memory. Lack of sleep dims your memory and weakens your ability to focus. Exercise to improve circulation, which delivers the oxygen and nutrient-rich blood to your brain. Eating brain-boosting foods like broccoli and blueberries will also help.

The key to passing the GED test and any exam is thorough planning and preparation. Thorough planning here means studying with a purpose. Instead of mindlessly going through every subject, focus only on the included topics, especially your weak areas. Commit to a study plan and schedule.

5 Great SAT Tips – What to Expect on Test Day

1. Start Preparing Early

To get the most out of SAT prep, you should start early. In fact, many National Merit Scholars-who usually score above 2100 on the SAT-begin preparing for the PSAT and SAT the summer before they become sophomores so they can make the most of the PSAT they have the option to take that year. Don’t start wondering whether or not third-order polynomials will be included in the math section the week before. Create a plan! If you need more structure or guidance, consider SAT prep classes, private tutoring, or an online course.

2. Dress Well

Think about this: the thermostat at the testing center on the morning of the test is likely to be set by someone just as groggy as you. You don’t want to trust them with your comfort-and shivering while you bubble is a sure way to “make a stray mark.” Avoid this by dressing in layers of comfortable clothing so you can adjust to your surroundings easily.

3. Be On Time

The College Board is not happy when you’re late to an SAT. To them, late is showing up after they’ve closed the doors to the testing rooms-between 8:30 and 9:00 am. In fact, their official policy states that late students will not be admitted to the testing center and will have to reschedule to take the test. Of course, there is a $24 fee for that. It’s fine if you don’t want to reschedule, but the fee you paid to take the test is nonrefundable. That’s $47 gone to waste. How do you make sure this doesn’t happen to you? Show up before 7:45 am, as the College Board recommends. A few days before the test, map out a route to your testing center and make sure you’re familiar with it. If you’re particularly bad with directions, you might want to practice getting there-just think of it as another thing to study.

4. You Are Getting Very Sleepy…

Falling asleep during the SAT: fail. You could nap during one of the five-minute breaks you get, but we doubt it would do you any good. Instead, be sure to get a good night’s sleep before the SAT. Caffeine in the morning-be it coffee or an energy drink-might be a good idea, but if you should avoid it if you aren’t accustomed to it. Too much caffeine can lead to jitters and, ironically enough, difficulty concentrating.

5. Oops! I Did It Again…

If you mess up, don’t worry: In 2009, the College Board introduced Score Choice, which allows you to select which test scores you want to send to a college on your score report. It is an optional service; if you do not elect to use it, all of your scores will be included on your score reports. Though it allows you to not disclose poor scores to the schools when applying, you should check your institution’s policy on SAT score reporting-often it is helpful to report all of your scores.