IAS Exam Preparation Guidance and Success Tips

Indian Administrative service (IAS) is the most reputed Job of India. The Officers of this respected Civil service are recruited through Civil service examination (also called IAS exam) conducted by UPSC. IAS service though has incomparable power associated with it, it also brings numerous responsibilities. For example, An IAS officer (and also officers of other reputed civil service like IFS, IPS) has to be diplomatic enough to understand and manage the situations that arise in the civil services on a regular basis.

Civil services are no bed of roses. Thus the UPSC takes full care in recruitment of the officers that’ll manage the steel frame of the country. There job is to fit the Right man into the Right job and they are experts in doing it. There are a few qualities that are being looked for in the candidate during selection process. This is the reason why the success rate is so low in this exam. Lakhs of students compete every year for getting into prestigious civil services, but only about less than a thousand make it.

In order to be successful, a candidate firstly has to make a right concept in mind about this exam. Success is not very far if preparation is done on a regular basis. Structurally preparing for every stage brings the candidate to some milestone in the first attempt itself (or even may go through). Provided that the new pattern of the IAS exam is likely to give importance to younger candidates with sharp and agile mind and dedication as the aptitude factor is the sole criteria now to judge candidates in the prelims exam.

Consulting any senior and successful candidate, Reading the toppers testimonials and going through previous IAS exam papers is always helpful for developing the right concept. It’s not necessary to cover the entire syllabus in the exam, because the expectations of UPSC are not possible to overcome in real sense. But candidate needs to analyze his strengths and then to focus upon them to facilitate his success in this exam rather than trying to prepare everything.

Remember, the recruiters are only assessing one’s personality and not judging it finally. Because the personality of a person keeps changing throughout his whole life. Thus every candidate must analyze himself if he is right for this job or not. This assessment can be done in the attempt or two, and if no positive signs are seen in initial attempts, the candidate must leave trying back to back and try something that suites his personality. Because more than anything it’s about something that lies inside that the recruiters are able to see even the candidate doesn’t know it. It’s the reason why some candidates make it to IAS in the first attempt itself, and many people aren’t able to go through even after seven attempts.

Thus, candidates must not waste numerous years for IAS preparation in various coaching institutes. Specially lower and middle class candidates should think carefully and not to sit with it after two or three unsuccessful attempts. As the IAS toppers say that success is about analyzing the competition and strengths and then preparing structurally for every stage with a right concept in mind.

All the Best for your Success!!!!

What Is The HESI Exit Exam and How Can I Ensure That I Pass It?

The HESI exam is an essential step to becoming a nurse. It is a standardized exam developed by Health Education Systems, Inc (HESI) and is designed to assess student competency and evaluate achievement of curricular outcomes. The HESI exam also measures the capacity of each nursing student to pass the final board exam, the NCLEX. You are likely to be told that you must pass the HESI exam otherwise you will not get to take the final NCLEX and risk compromising your chances of graduating. The practice exams are the first step and getting a score of over 900 is great preparation for your final HESI exam, but how do you ensure that you do well?

There is no secret to passing but there are some simple tips and tricks you can follow to make sure you are as prepared as possible before the exam.

  • Create a study group. People tend to be more productive and remember things better when they feel supported by others. Think about arranging to meet up with a few classmates on a regular basis and see if it helps.
  • Buy an online review. Some organizations will provide review sessions that you can complete online and track your progress in this way. A lot of these resources will also provide you with helpful hints and tips to make sure you are fully prepared for the exam.
  • Buy a book. You can purchase material directly from HESI and some include a disc with practice exams on it. By practicing on your computer you will be preparing yourself for how the actual exam will work. Study guides are a great resource too. Look for ones that say “NCLEX PREP” and make sure that they are authentic and up to date. You can complete the questions and then check how you did by looking up the answers. This is great practice for how the questions will actually look on the day.
  • Focus on your weaknesses. You should have a good idea of what your good at and what you’re not good at in the run up to the HESI exam. You should study the entire curriculum in order to be well-prepared but it is a good idea to pay special attention to the areas you are not so confident on. Look back at your class notes for help or look out for resources that specifically focus on this area.
  • Don’t let complicated wording put you off. A lot of the questions on the HESI exam require common sense questions but complicated wording can sometime confuse matters. Try to translate any jargon and think about what the question is actually asking. Practice will help in this area, but above all, always read the question thoroughly!
  • Get your family and friends onside. The people around you need to understand that this is a very important time for you and that if you don’t see them for a few days it is because you need to focus your thoughts. Having the support of your loved ones behind you is a great confidence boost and once they understand just how important studying for the HESI exam is, they should hopefully give you some space to get on with it.
  • Brain food. On the day of the HESI exam make sure you have had a good breakfast to help you concentrate. You might even want to take a snack with you to keep you going. Taking a quick mental break by nipping to the bathroom during the exam can help to refresh and renew your brain, allowing you to continue with the exam in an effective way.
  • You’re not on your own. Finally, realize that many other nurses are taking or have taken the HESI exam and they have got through it, so there is no reason why you can’t do the same! Positive-thinking really can work wonders.

If you follow these simple tips, you will enter the HESI exam feeling well-prepared, relaxed and ready to perform to the best of your abilities.

USMLE Step 1 Exam Prep – 4 High-Yield Brachial Plexus Tips For The Step 1 Exam

While many people preparing for their USMLE Step 1 exams tend to focus on the tougher subjects like Pathology and Pharmacology, it is imperative that you do a good review of your Anatomy material because you are guaranteed to get a few really easy questions. If you take just a little bit of time to go through the high-yield anatomy notes from your review books or course, you are going to get an easy 5-7 points on your exam, which as you may know can be the difference between a sub-200 score and an above-200 score.

In order to make this process as easy for you as possible, I am going to outline five common injuries that are related to the brachial plexus, which is a very high-yield USMLE topic.

Here we go:

Median Nerve Injury – this commonly results from an injury to the supracondyle of the humerus, and results in a loss of the following:

– forearm pronation

– wrist flexion

– finger flexion

– thumb movement

And it also results in a loss of sensation to the thumb, lateral aspect of the palm, and the first 2.5 fingers.

Radial Nerve Injury – this occurs commonly when there is an injury to the shaft of the humerus, and results in the following:

– loss of triceps reflex

– loss of brachioradialis reflex

– loss of carpi radialis longus

These symptoms lead to the commonly known “wrist drop”, as well as a loss of sensation to the posterior antebrachial cutaneous and the posterior brachial cutaneous nerves.

Ulnar Nerve Injury – this occurs with injury to the medial epicondyle of the humerus, and causes the following problems:

– impaired flexion and adduction of the wrist

– impaired adduction of the ulnar two fingers and the thumb

There is also a loss of sensation to the medial aspect of the palm, as well as loss of sensation to the medial half of the ring finger and the pinky.

Axillary Nerve Injury – occurs as a result of injury to the surgical neck of the humerus and/or an anterior dislocation of the shoulder, resulting in the following:

– complete loss of deltoid movement

– loss of sensation over the deltoid muscle as well as the skin covering the inferior aspect of the deltoid

These are four common brachial plexus related injuries, and are very likely to present themselves on your USMLE Step 1 and/or Step 2 CK exams. Be aware that they will be disguised as clinical vignettes, but also refer back to your basic knowledge in order to choose the most accurate answer.

ACT Or SAT? Five Tips to Pick the Right College Entrance Exam

The SAT and ACT are both respected, nationally-recognized tests. Historically, there’s been a geographic divide between the two; nowadays, very few colleges require or prefer one test over the other. So which one should you take? Well, since you can’t really say one test is any easier than the other, that all depends on your skills and preferences. Basically, you should go for the one you’ll score higher on!

Here are some tips to help you make your decision:

1. Who says size doesn’t matter?

The ACT is a shorter test. The SAT takes a whopping 3 hours, 45 minutes, while the ACT comes out to a hefty 2 hours, 55 minutes, making the SAT about 30% longer than the ACT. Either way, you’re stuck taking a long test. If you have a ridiculously short attention span, then the ACT might be right for you, but realistically, after nearly 3 hours, why sweat an extra 50 minutes?

2. When in doubt, just guess… right?

The SAT has a guessing penalty – minus a quarter of a point for each incorrect response. Not so with the ACT. Guess away! So you should answer every question on the ACT, but on the SAT, you should just leave the answer blank when you can’t eliminate at least one answer choice. Does this make the SAT “harder”? Not really. With the right strategies, you can even make the SAT’s guessing penalty work to your advantage.

3. It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s superscore!

The SAT reports each of your three “subscores” separately-one each for critical reading, writing, and mathematics. So, many colleges will combine your best three subscores from all the times you’ve taken the SAT to make a “superscore.” In the past, schools would not do this with the ACT. Recently, however, many schools have begun to make ACT “superscores” too.

4. What is the difference anyway?

Both tests have a grammar, reading comprehension, essay and math portions. The ACT has an extra “science” section, but don’t worry. I used quotes because it’s really just another test of your reasoning skills – not much chemistry, physics or biology knowledge needed. Broadly speaking, the ACT tests skills that you (should have) learned in high school, while the SAT tries to evaluate your innate problem-solving abilities.

For example, the ACT math section tests a few topics that typically aren’t covered until pre-calculus. While the SAT leaves out these topics, its math problems generally have more complicated setups.

The ACT’s essay is optional, but some colleges require it anyway. Its essay topics are always questions of school policy, while the SAT’s essays deal with more abstract moral or philosophical issues.

In the critical reading sections, the SAT’s vocabulary is harder, but the ACT taxes your critical reading and analysis skills. The ACT English section gives you a couple of long passages with grammar and critical reading questions mixed together; the SAT tests reading and grammar separately.

5. You can’t know if you like it till you’ve tried it!

How do I know which test is better for me? Try them! Take some free practice tests online and see which one fits your fancy. Both the SAT and ACT offer practice questions or tests on their official websites.